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Thoracic outlet syndrome Radiology

The term thoracic outlet syndrome was coined by Peet et al (, 11) in 1956 to indicate compression of one or several of the neurovascular structures crossing the thoracic outlet. The most common age range for this syndrome is 20-40 years, with a female-to-male ratio of 4:1 (, 10) Patients with symptoms from compression of the neurovascular bundle in the thoracic outlet are described as having thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), which is best thought of as three conditions classified according to which structures are involved Diagnosis of the thoracic outlet syndrome is often difficult, particularly in patients without osseous abnormalities on plain radiographs. The radiographic and computed tomographic (CT) findings were reviewed from 27 patients with thoracic outlet syndrome and 21 normal subjects

Imaging Assessment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome RadioGraphic

  1. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) News; Radiology. 5Imaging services are a vital component of our TOS Center, providing state-of-the-art applications of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography, and interventional radiology
  2. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome TOS is the constellation of symptoms produced when the neurovascular structures that traverse the thoracic outlet are compressed
  3. 1 Thoracic Outlet Syndrome . American College of Radiology . ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Thoracic Outlet Syndrome . Variant 1: Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. Initial imaging and follow-up imaging after surgery or intervention. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level. MRI chest without and with IV contrast
  4. or space), which extend from the cervical spine and mediastinum to the lower border of the pectoralis
  5. In TOS, cervical rib, elongated C7 transverse process, and other bony abnormalities that can compress the thoracic outlet are easily shown by cervical x-ray. 13 Evaluation of the BPL and the subclavian artery and vein in neutral and abduction positions are necessary and easily performed by MR imaging

Imaging of the Patient with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

  1. Thoracic outlet syndrome surgery has risks of complications, such as injury to the brachial plexus. Also, surgery may not relieve your symptoms, and symptoms may recur. Surgery to treat thoracic outlet syndrome, called thoracic outlet decompression, may be performed using several different approaches, including
  2. Introduction/Background Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a clinical entity characterized by compression of the neurovascular bundle of the upper limb as it passes from the upper thoracic aperture to the axilla
  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a term used to describe a group of disorders that occur when there is compression, injury, or irritation of the nerves and/or blood vessels (arteries and veins) in the lower neck and upper chest area

Medical image. Unusual case of thoracic outlet syndrome. A 39-year-old previously fit woman presented acutely to the emergency department with acute left upper limb ischaemia. On examination, the tips of the index and middle fingers were dusky Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is the clinical entity that occurs with compression of the brachial plexus, subclavian artery, and/or subclavian vein at the superior thoracic outlet Diagnosing Thoracic Outlet Syndrome The thoracic outlet is the space between the collarbone and the first rib. The nerves, arteries, and veins in this area serve the arms and hands. When they become compressed, you have thoracic outlet syndrome

Thoracic outlet syndrome: evaluation with CT

Thoracic outlet Thoracic outlet syndrome is a group of disorders that occur when blood vessels or nerves in the space between your collarbone and your first rib (thoracic outlet) are compressed. This can cause pain in your shoulders and neck and numbness in your fingers Materials and methods: Thirty-five healthy volunteers and 54 patients with clinical symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thoracic outlets with their arms alongside their bodies and after a postural maneuver

Radiology Center for Thoracic Outlet Syndrom

  1. istration should occur.
  2. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Protocol Design and Diagnostic Value of Contrast-Enhanced 3D MR Angiography and Equilibrium Phase Imaging on 1.5- and 3-T MRI Scanners Hale Ersoy 1 2 , Michael L. Steigner 1 , Karl B. Coyner 1 , Marie D. Gerhard-Herman 3 , Frank J. Rybicki 1 , Raphael Bueno 4 and Louis L. Nguyen
  3. Objective: True neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (TN-TOS) is an extremely rare neuromuscular disease. We report clinical, electrodiagnostic and radiologic features of patients with TN-TOS. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients satisfying criteria was done. Nerve conduction study (NCS) and needle electromyography (EMG) of upper extremity were reviewed
  4. Paget-Schrötter syndrome. Paget-Schrötter syndrome, alternatively spelled Paget-Schroetter syndrome and also known as effort thrombosis , refers to primary thrombosis of the axillary and/or subclavian vein. It can be thought of as a venous equivalent of thoracic outlet syndrome - i.e venous thoracic outlet syndrome
  5. This chapter will review the anatomy of the upper extremity veins and thoracic outlet in addition to the prevalence, causes, clinical characteristics, complications, and diagnostic imaging of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis and thoracic outlet syndrome

Imaging of the Patient with Thoracic Outlet Syndrom

Terminology. Subclavian steal phenomenon refers to steno-occlusive disease of the proximal subclavian artery with retrograde flow in the ipsilateral vertebral artery.. Subclavian steal syndrome is the same as subclavian steal phenomenon with the addition of cerebral ischemic symptoms.. Epidemiology. There is an increased incidence with age and the greater male predilection with a M:F ratio of 2:1 Venous thoracic outlet syndrome. Dr Patrick J Rock and Dr Yuranga Weerakkody et al. The venous thoracic outlet syndrome is the second commonest form of thoracic outlet syndrome (with neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome being the commonest and the arterial thoracic outlet syndrome being the least common). On this page

1. Introduction. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) comprises a group of disorders that result in compression of the neurovasculature exiting the thoracic outlet and was first described in 1956 [].TOS classically occurs in three spaces—the scalene triangle, the costoclavicular space, and the subcoracoid space Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a family of conditions in which either the blood vessels or nerves are compressed, resulting in nonspecific symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the affected area. Imaging can confirm the origin of the condition, but it is not necessary to diagnose TOS

INTRODUCTION. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a constellation of signs and symptoms that arise from compression of the neurovascular bundle by various structures in the area just above the first rib and behind the clavicle, within the confined space of the thoracic outlet [].Historically, several names have been coined to describe pathology involving the thoracic outlet, including. Imaging Diagnosis of Arterial TOS Venous TOS is quite uncommon. However, the presentation of venous TOS is quite dramatic, and complications can be serious. Venous TOS occurs when a blood clot forms in the main vein draining the arm. Although some treatment questions remain unsettled, doctors treat the blood clot urgently. Following this, doctors undertake diagnosis an

Thoracic Outlet Syndrom

Video: Imaging assessment of thoracic outlet syndrom

Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a controversial diagnosis, and is often difficult to make. Contributing factors that may predispose to TOS include the presence of a cervical rib, fibrous bands, hypertrophied muscles, repetitive trauma, or anatomical variants ().Surgical management is often a last resort after conservative measures fail The CTPA showed no pulmonary emboli, but demonstrated right subclavian vein stenosis with collateral circulation ( figures 1 and 2 ). On the basis of these radiological findings, a diagnosis of right subclavian vein obstruction or thoracic inlet syndrome (TIS) was made. The patient denied neck or arm pain, numbness, or tingling al position and after postural maneuver (164 acquisitions); with contralateral injection of a 24% (Group 1; n = 68) or 30% (Group 2; n = 96) contrast agent; and reconstruction of four sets of images from each acquisition, that is, transverse CT scans, sagittal reformations, and 3D [shaded surface displays (SSD) and volume-rendered (VR)] images. A total of 656 sets of images were blindly and. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Orthopedic Tests Page 4 of 26 recommended. (Nannapaneni 2003, Rayan 1998) A positive test is production of paresthesia in the arm (mostly commonly along the ulnar distribution) as opposed to local pain. Palpation in the supraclavicular fossa may produce radiating pain or paresthesia or.

Thoracic outlet syndrome, a group of diverse disorders, is a collection of symptoms in the shoulder and upper extremity area that results in pain, numbness, and tingling. Identification of thoracic outlet syndrome is complex and a thorough clinical examination in addition to appropriate clinical testing can aide in diagnosis. Practitioners must consider the pathology of thoracic outlet. Abstract. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) constitutes a group of diverse conditions that result from compression of the neurovascular bundle—the brachial plexus, subclavian vein, and subclavian artery—as it exits the thoracic outlet. Of the TOS subtypes, neurogenic TOS accounts for more than 95% of cases, venous TOS accounts for 3%-5% of. Background: Venous thoracic outlet syndrome resulting in the upper limb deep venous thrombosis is known as Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort thrombosis. A general treatment algorithm includes catheter-directed thrombolysis followed by surgical thoracic outlet decompression. There are limited data regarding endovascular treatment of rethrombosis presenting early after the surgery Abstract. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is the clinical syndrome resulting from symptomatic compression of the neurovascular bundle at the thoracic outlet, and is subclassified as neurogenic, venous, or arterial depending on the structure involved Arterial Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) Important features of arterial TOS include the following: Vascular laboratory studies are useful in suspected arterial TOS, both to provide initial imaging of the neck and for more accurate definition in functional blood flow in the upper extremity. Duplex ultrasound imaging is used to detect the.

Thoracic Spine Series: New Treatment Option for Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. If you've had symptoms like numbness or tingling in your hands or arm, aches or pain in your shoulder or neck, a weakening grip, or the muscles in your hand shrinking, you may have been told you have thoracic outlet syndrome Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of rare conditions involving compression of the brachial plexus, a group of nerves and blood vessels that serves the arm and hand. Problems can also affect the subclavian blood vessels that pass through the base of the neck and behind the collarbone. Learn more about the anatomy of the thoracic outlet

Vascular Thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS) is categorized as disorders of the upper extremity, which are caused by compression of the brachial plexus and subclavian artery or vein by bony, soft tissue or muscular anomalies as they emerge from the thoracic outlet. Vascular TOS usually occurs in young patients and athletes who are involved in repetitive overhead motion, such as swimming or baseball Historical Background . Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is recognized to encompass three conditions: (1) neurogenic TOS, caused by compression of the brachial plexus nerve roots within the scalene triangle, subcoracoid space, or both; (2) venous TOS, caused by compression of the axillary, subclavian, or both veins and leading to the effort thrombosis syndrome; and (3) arterial TOS, caused by. → To schedule an appointment, call 1-800-3-ADVOCATE or find vascular surgeons and interventional radiology physicians online. About Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. When blood vessels and nerves going to the arm are compressed between the collarbone and the first rib, a range of symptoms can occur. Symptoms & Diagnosi Imaging diagnosis of venous TOS-Imaging tests confirm the presence of a large venous blood clot. This clot causes the symptoms of venous TOS, and requires urgent treatment. After successful treatment of the blood clot, imaging details structures that compress the vein, and damage to the vein Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) may affect neurologic or vascular structures, or both, depending on the component of the neurovascular bundle predominantly compressed. Types include neurologic, arterial, venous, and neurovascular/combined, and patients may present with signs and symptoms of nerve,..

Postsurgical imaging should be used to confirm patency of the subclavian vein. Conclusion. Thoracic outlet syndrome is a diagnostic category representing a spectrum of conditions characterized by compression of neurovascular structures as they pass through the thoracic outlet. Paget-Shroetter syndrome is a subtype of TOS characterized by effort. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) is the constellation of symptoms caused by compression of neurovascular structures at the superior aperture of the thorax, properly the thoracic inlet Abstract: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a collection of different symptoms and disorders that affect the shoulder and upper extremity area, resulting from the compression of the neurovascular structures at the superior aperture of the thorax. The diagnosis of TOS, which includes a physical examination and clinical tests is often difficult. Indications for surgical treatment are debated and. Thoracic outlet syndrome can cause swelling, discoloration, weakness, numbness or pain in the shoulder, arm and fingers. Sports that involve repeated shoulder movement, such as baseball or swimming, may increase your risk, as can injuries to the back or neck, poor posture or defects defects present from birth Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome. Am Surg 1997; 63:913. Sanders RJ. Diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome. Journal of Vascular Surgery. 2007; 46(3):606-607. Aghayev A, Rybicki FJ. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging in vascular thoracic outlet syndrome. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America, 2015; 23(2.

Thoracic outlet syndrome is not the name of a single entity, but rather a collective title for a variety of conditions attributed to compression of these neurovascular structures as they traverse the thoracic outlet. The thoracic outlet is bordered by the scalene muscles, first rib, and clavicle Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a broad term that refers to compression of the neurovascular structures in the area just above the first rib and behind the clavicle that results in upper extremity symptoms. It represents a constellation of symptoms. The cause, diagnosis, and treatment are controversial. The brachial plexus (95%), subclavian vein (4%), and subclavian artery (1%) are affected. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) may affect neurological or vascular structures, or both, depending on the component of the neurovascular bundle predominantly compressed. Types include neurological, arterial, venous, and neurovascular/combined, and patients may present with signs and symptoms of nerve, vein, or artery compression or any.

The thoracic outlet is the area between your neck and upper chest, formed by your top ribs and framed by your collarbone. Thoracic outlet syndrome happens when structures at the top of the outlet press on nerves or blood vessels that pass through. These structures can include the top rib, the collarbone or neck muscles Several imaging modalities may be utilized in the workup of thoracic outlet syndrome. Initial radiographs of the cervical spine and chest should be obtained at the time of first evaluation to assess for the presence of an elongated C7 transverse process or cervical rib on the affected side (Wilbourn 1999; Fig. 3) Channel Memberships : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG5TBPANNSiKf1Dp-R5Dibg/joinThoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is an umbrella term for conditions involvin.. Imaging, including vascular imaging, may be indicated to rule out arterial thoracic outlet syndrome, venous thoracic outlet syndrome, and traumatic neurovascular thoracic outlet syndrome. In 1 series, 65% of patients with a presumed diagnosis of disputed thoracic outlet syndrome were found to have an alternative diagnosis ( 21 )

The Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Thoracic Surgery provides comprehensive evaluation and treatment for patients with all forms of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), including neurogenic, venous and arterial Hussain MA, Aljabri B, Al-Omran M. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2016 Spring;28(1):151-7 full-text, editorial can be found in Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2016 Spring;28(1):158; Raptis CA, Sridhar S, Thompson RW, Fowler KJ, Bhalla S. Imaging of the Patient with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome At the Ochsner Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Center, patients receive unparalleled care and experience stellar clinical outcomes. As the leading health system in the region and an academic medical center, the Ochsner team has experience across various disciplines, including physical and occupational therapy , neurology , radiology , anesthesia and. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of conditions caused by compression of the neurovascular structures that serve the upper extremity. The thoracic outlet is located within the lower part of the neck, behind the clavicle and above the first rib, extending into the axilla, and it is often described by several closely related anatomic spaces, including the scalene triangle, the. Thoracic outlet syndrome is a disorder caused by the compression of nerves, arteries, and/or veins that pass through the spaces of the thoracic outlet. Symptoms usually include pain which can be felt in the head, neck, shoulder, arm, and/or chest. The location of the pain is generally correlated with the specific nerve roots between C5 and T1.

T1 - Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. T2 - Current Concepts, Imaging Features, and Therapeutic Strategies. AU - Buller, Leonard T. AU - Jose, Jean. AU - Baraga, Michael. AU - Lesniak, Bryson P. PY - 2015/8/1. Y1 - 2015/8/1. N2 - Thoracic outlet syndrome describes a set of disorders resulting from compression of the brachial plexus and/or subclavian. Patients with thoracic outlet syndrome will most likely present pain anywhere between the neck, face and occipital region or into the chest, shoulder and upper extremity and paresthesia in the upper extremity. The patient may also complain of altered or absent sensation, weakness, fatigue, a feeling of heaviness in the arm and hand Summary. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is an umbrella term for conditions involving the compression of neurovascular structures (e.g., the brachial plexus or the subclavian artery or vein) as they pass from the lower neck to the armpit.Causes include trauma, tumors, or the presence of a cervical rib.Neurogenic TOS is the most common type and involves the compression of the brachial plexus. Imaging assessment of thoracic outlet syndrome. Radiographics. However, clinical diagnosis is often difficult; thus, the use of imaging is required to demonstrate neurovascular compression and to determine the nature and location of the structure undergoing compression and the structure producing the compression. Cervical plain radiography. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) refers to a condition that affects the area between the rib cage and the collar bone. In that area, blood vessels and nerve pass through a narrow space leading to the arm. If they do not have sufficient room and are compressed symptoms materialize in the hands or arms. The presence of an extra rib above the.

MR Imaging Findings in Brachial Plexopathy with Thoracic

Missed Cervical Ribs Alter Pain Management in Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. A radiograph to detect the presence of a cervical rib should be mandatory prior to thoracic outlet syndrome surgery as a baseline study. This 47-year-old, right-handed female physical therapist was referred by a neurologist for bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of. 50. Diagnosis and treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome in The Netherlands. 51. Research Directions in Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. 52. Anatomy and Pathophysiology of Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndrome . 53. Diagnosis of VTOS: 2016 Consensus guidelines. 54. Imaging in VTOS. 55. VTOS for the PCP- When to Consider the Diagnosis. 56

A diagnosis can be confirmed with medical imaging or electrical studies. The conventional treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome usually involves prescription medications such as anti-inflammatories. In some situations, patients may be prescribed medications to dissolve blood clots as well. If this is not enough, there are situations where a. Venous thoracic outlet: More acute in onset, this variety typically occurs when new or tiring arm movements cause damage to the veins in the lower neck or upper chest.The venous version can lead to swelling in the arms or hands, chest wall vein dilation, and a heavy sensation in the arm or hand muscles

Imaging with ultrasound, contrast-enhanced CT, MRI or conventional angiography is useful for detecting vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (e.g. arterial and/or venous compression). Imaging is performed with the patient's arms both in the raised (abducted) and neutral (adducted) positions for comparison The term thoracic outlet syndrome was coined by Peet et al (, 11) in 1956 to indicate compression of one or several of the neurovascular structures crossing the thoracic outlet. The most common age range for this syndrome is 20-40 years, with a female-to-male ratio of 4:1 ( , 10 ) Abstract. Patients with symptoms from compression of the neurovascular bundle in the thoracic outlet are described as having thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), which is best thought of as three conditions classified according to which structures are involved. The purpose of this article is to review the role of imaging in evaluation of patients. CHEST IMAGING 984 Imaging of the Patient with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome1 Patients with symptoms from compression of the neurovascular bundle in the thoracic outlet are described as having thoracic out-let syndrome (TOS), which is best thought of as three conditions classified according to which structures are involved. The purpos

Thoracic outlet syndrome - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo

Patients with symptoms from compression of the neurovascular bundle in the thoracic outlet are described as having thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), which is best thought of as three conditions classified according to which structures are involved. The purpose of this article is to review the role of Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is the clinical entity that occurs with compression of the brachial plexus, subclavian artery, and/or subclavian vein at the superior thoracic outlet. Compression of each of these structures results in characteristic symptoms divided into three variants: neurogenic TOS

Bilateral cervical ribs | Image | Radiopaedia

Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a term used to describe a group of disorders that occur when there is compression, injury, or irritation of the nerves and/or blood vessels (arteries and veins) in the lower neck and upper chest area. Learn about Causes, Symptoms, Treatment and Therapy Options from the number one heart center, Cleveland Clinic Imaging and nerve study tests. To confirm the diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome, your doctor may order one or more of the following tests: X-ray. Your doctor may order an X-ray of the affected area, which may reveal an extra rib (cervical rib). X-rays may also rule out other conditions that may be causing your symptoms omy of the thoracic outlet on anatomic sections and CT, MR, and US images. Describe the use of various imaging tech-niques in assessment of thoracic outlet syndrome. Discuss the useful-ness of postural ma-neuvers in associa-tion with imaging techniques in assess-ment of thoracic out-let syndrome. Xavier Demondion, MD Pascal Herbinet, MD Serge.

Purpose: To compare the dynamic modifications of the thoracic outlet in asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients and assess the presence and location of vasculonervous compressions in these two populations. Materials and methods: Thirty-five healthy volunteers and 54 patients with clinical symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the. Diagnosis of the thoracic outlet syndrome is often difficult, particularly in patients without osseous abnormalities on plain radiographs. The radiographic and computed tomographic (CT) findings were reviewed from 27 patients with thoracic outlet syndrome and 21 normal subjects Thoracic outlet syndrome in a throwing athlete diagnosed with MRI and MRA. J Magn Reson Imaging 1997; 7: 598-599. Crossref, Medline, Google Scholar; 35 Charon JP, Milne W, Sheppard JG, Houston JG. Evaluation of MR angiographic technique in the assessment of thoracic outlet syndrome. Clin Radiol 2004; 59: 588-595. Crossref, Medline, Google. Neurogenic (neurological) thoracic outlet syndrome. This most common type of thoracic outlet syndrome is characterized by compression of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that come from your spinal cord and control muscle movements and sensation in your shoulder, arm and hand. Vascular thoracic outlet syndrome

Imaging in the Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Imaging studies play a significant role in assessment of thoracic outlet syndrome. In this article, we discuss the etiology and definition of thoracic outlet syndrome and review the spectrum of imaging findings seen in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome. We then discuss an optimized technique fo Remy-Jardin M, Remy J, Masson P, et al. CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome: evaluation of imaging protocols for the detection of arterial stenosis. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2000;24(3):349-361. Remy-Jardin M, Remy J, Masson P, et al. Helical CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome: functional anatomy. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2000;174(6. T2-weighted imaging TOS thoracic outlet syndrome TSE turbo spin-echo. Many disease processes affect the BPL, and the common lesions can vary according to the age of subjects. In neonates and adolescents, traumatic injury is common. In middle-aged and older individuals, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors of the BPL, cervical spondylosis, TOS, and. The thoracic outlet is a small area between your collarbone, first rib and vertebra. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of conditions characterized by compression of the nerves, arteries or veins in this space. Thoracic outlet syndrome can cause neck and shoulder pain, numbness and tingling of the fingers and a weak grip Ping response time 5ms Excellent ping Site Owner: American Thoracic Society Domain provide by not available. Domain ID : Not Available Host name ec2-54-226-209-140.compute-1.amazonaws.com, IP address: 54.226.209.140, location: Ashburn United State

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